Encyclopedia of Cybercrime
by Samuel C. McQuade III, ed.
November 2008, 232pp, 7x10
1 volume, Greenwood

Hardcover: 978-0-313-33974-5
$83, £62, 70€, A119
Paperback: 978-1-4408-3594-0
$45, £34, 38€, A65
eBook Available: 978-0-313-08704-2
Please contact your preferred eBook vendor for pricing.

The first comprehensive encyclopedia to examine all aspects of the mysterious world of cybercrime

There are today no more compelling sets of crime and security threats facing nations, communities, organizations, groups, families and individuals than those encompassed by cybercrime. For over fifty years crime enabled by computing and telecommunications technologies have increasingly threatened societies as they have become reliant on information systems for sustaining modernized living. Cybercrime is not a new phenomenon, rather an evolving one with respect to adoption of information technology (IT) for abusive and criminal purposes. Further, by virtue of the myriad ways in which IT is abused, it represents a technological shift in the nature of crime rather than a new form of criminal behavior. In other words, the nature of crime and its impacts on society are changing to the extent computers and other forms of IT are used for illicit purposes. Understanding the subject, then, is imperative to combatting it and to addressing it at various levels.

This work is the first comprehensive encyclopedia to address cybercrime. Topical articles address all key areas of concern and specifically those having to with: terminology, definitions and social constructs of crime; national infrastructure security vulnerabilities and capabilities; types of attacks to computers and information systems; computer abusers and cybercriminals; criminological, sociological, psychological and technological theoretical underpinnings of cybercrime; social and economic impacts of crime enabled with information technology (IT) inclusive of harms experienced by victims of cybercrimes and computer abuse; emerging and controversial issues such as online pornography, the computer hacking subculture and potential negative effects of electronic gaming and so-called computer addiction; bodies and specific examples of U.S. federal laws and regulations that help to prevent cybercrimes; examples and perspectives of law enforcement, regulatory and professional member associations concerned about cybercrime and its impacts; and computer forensics as well as general investigation/prosecution of high tech crimes and attendant challenges within the United States and internationally.

Samuel C. McQuade III currently serves as the Professional Studies Graduate Program Coordinator at the Rochester Institute of Technology. He is a former Air National Guard security officer, deputy sheriff and police officer, police organizational change consultant, National Institute of Justice Program Manager for the U.S Department of Justice, and Study Director for the Committee on Law and Justice at the National Research Council of the National Academies of Sciences. He is the author of Understanding and Managing Cybercrime, among many other publications.

Reviews

"Cybercrime is a growing phenomenon, though not necessarily a new one. For instance, phreaking—the unauthorized use and exploration of the telephone system—dates back to at least the 1960s. With entries written by experts at a level appropriate for high school students and undergraduates, this encyclopedia covers all the important topics. Recommended. Lower- and upper-level undergraduates, two-year technical program students, and the general readers."—Choice, May 1, 2009

"The Encyclopedia of Cybercrime aptly demonstrates that individuals, businesses, and community groups of all kinds--and even national governments--are at risk. It describes child pornography, copyright infringement, cyberbullying, espionage, identity theft, malware, and many other illegal activities. McQuade's aim was to address teh "information needs and interests of high school and undergraduate college students," and he has largely succeeded. Beyond basic descriptions of types of crimes, the Encyclopedia of Cybercrimes introduces readers to theory, research, prevention, careers, and related organizations. Thus readers asking almost any type of question about cybercrime will find a starting point. Despite the technical nature of the topic, the Encyclopedia of Cybercrime is very understandable, typically spelling out and explaining each acronym and using current, everyday examples to explain complex ideas. ...a recommended, additional title for any public or undergraduate library..."—Reference & User Services Quarterly, October 1, 2009
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