Fathers across Cultures
The Importance, Roles, and Diverse Practices of Dads
by Jaipaul L. Roopnarine, Editor
August 2015, 451pp, 6 1/8x9 1/4
1 volume, Praeger

Hardcover: 978-1-4408-3231-4
$80, £60, 67€, A115
eBook Available: 978-1-4408-3232-1
Please contact your preferred eBook vendor for pricing.

How do fathering practices differ in the Islamic world from in America?

This volume offers a comprehensive, up-to-date synopsis of fathering and father-child relationships in diverse regions of the world, helping students and practitioners alike understand cultural variations in male parenting.

Interest in the role of the father and his influence on children’s development and economic well-being has grown considerably. This edited volume uses detailed accounts to provide culturally situated analysis of fathering in cultures around the world. The book’s contributors, a multidisciplinary group of scholars, bring together the most recent theoretical thinking and research findings on fatherhood and fathering in cultural communities across developed, recently developed, and developing societies. They address such issues as fathering and gender equality in caregiving, concepts of masculinity in contemporary societies, fathering in various ethnic groups, immigrant fathers, fathering and childhood outcomes, and social policies as they affect and are affected by issues related to fathering.

Organized geographically, the book scrutinizes major sociocultural, demographic, economic, and other factors that influence men’s relationships within families. It shows how economic conditions impact men’s involvement with children and considers the effects of ideological belief systems and views of spousal/partner roles and responsibilities. The analysis is underpinned by recent data that underscores the significance of fathers’ involvement with and investment in the well-being of their children.

Features

  • Explores variations in father-child relationships across a wide range of cultural settings
  • Enhances understanding of the increasing role of men in fostering the well-being of children
  • Calls attention to the importance of the diverse roles of fathers in a changing global community
  • Examines the changing dynamic of parenting vis-à-vis gender roles
  • Approaches the study of fathering from diverse disciplinary perspectives, including sociology, anthropology, psychology, human development and family studies, and early childhood development
Jaipaul L. Roopnarine, PhD, is Jack Reilly Professor of Child and Family Studies, director of the Jack Reilly Institute for Early Childhood and Provider Education, and adjunct professor of teaching and leadership in the School of Education, Syracuse University. He is also a research scientist at the Family Development and Children's Research Centre at the University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago. He served as a consultant to the Roving Caregiver Program, a home-based intervention program implemented in several Caribbean countries to improve the early caregiving environments of young children, and assisted in the revision of the national early childhood curriculum for the government of Guyana. Roopnarine received his bachelor's degree in psychology and his doctorate in child development from the University of Wisconsin, was a Fulbright scholar at the University of the West Indies in Trinidad and Tobago, and has held numerous other academic appointments. He has published more than 100 journal articles and book chapters and coedited volumes, including Praeger's Childhood and Adolescence: Cross-Cultural Perspectives and Applications as well as Approaches to Early Childhood Education, Sixth Edition and Families in Global Perspectives. He is the editor of the journal Fathering.

Reviews

"[A]n interesting and useful read . . . this text makes a contribution to expand the conversation."—PsycCRITIQUES, August 2, 2016
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