Topic: Library Programs and Services / Information Literacy, Inquiry, and Student Research

 
Guided Inquiry
Learning in the 21st Century
Carol C. Kuhlthau, Leslie K. Maniotes, and Ann K. Caspari
978-0-31309-615-0

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Carol C. Kuhlthau, Leslie K. Maniotes, and Ann K. Caspari
Carol C. Kuhlthau is a Professor Emerita of Library and Information Science at Rutgers University, where she directed the graduate program in school librarianship that has been rated number one in the country by U.S. News & World Report.

Leslie K. Maniotes, NBCT, MEd, PhD, is a teacher effectiveness coach in Denver Public Schools, a curriculum and literacy specialist, and a national consultant on inquiry learning and instructional design.

Ann K. Caspari is the Senior Museum Educator for the Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center.
ADD COPY 2009 ABC-CLIO

Guided Inquiry

Learning in the 21st Century

Carol C. Kuhlthau, Leslie K. Maniotes, and Ann K. Caspari Carol C. Kuhlthau, Leslie K. Maniotes, and Ann K. Caspari


October 2007

Libraries Unlimited

Series: Libraries Unlimited Guided Inquiry

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Pages
Volumes
Size
Paperback
188
1
7x10
 
ISBN
eISBN
978-1-59158-435-3
978-0-313-09615-0
Print in Stock
$45.00
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The authors set forth the theory and rationale behind adopting a Guided Inquiry approach to PreK–12 education, as well as the expertise, roles and responsibilities of each member of the instructional team.

Based on Kuhlthau's six stage Information Search Process, the authors present a convincing argument for recasting Guided Inquiry as a dynamic, innovative way of developing information literacy. Part I discusses the theory and rationale behind adopting a Guided Inquiry approach, as the authors elucidate the expertise, roles, and responsibilities of each member of the instructional team. Part II presents the model in terms of its component parts. PreK-12.

Noted researcher Kuhlthau has teamed up with a curriculum specialist and museum educator to create this foundational text on Guided Inquiry, a dynamic, integrated approach to teaching curriculum content, information literacy, and strategies for learning. Grounded in Kuhlthau's Information Search Process from her classic text Seeking Meaning and built on solid professional practice, this innovative team approach inspires students to gain deeper understandings and higher order thinking using the rich resources of the school library, the community and the wider world. This book provides the vital tools for educators to create collaborative environments where students experience school learning and real life meshed in integral ways—learning in the 21st century.
Carol C. Kuhlthau is a Professor Emerita of Library and Information Science at Rutgers University, where she directed the graduate program in school librarianship that has been rated number one in the country by U.S. News & World Report.

Leslie K. Maniotes, NBCT, MEd, PhD, is a teacher effectiveness coach in Denver Public Schools, a curriculum and literacy specialist, and a national consultant on inquiry learning and instructional design.

Ann K. Caspari is the Senior Museum Educator for the Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center.
Reviews
"Of great use to any K-12 school's professional development collection, particularly with the current emphasis on guided inquiry and student-centered learning, this work is a welcome addition not only to teachers and administrators but also to librarians."—ARBA

"The benefits, theory, and research behind this title are precisely and competently explained. Each chapter discusses a different element beginning with setting up the Guided Inquiry Team to an explanation of how to meet content area curriculum standards, assess student work, teach information literacy, and prepare students for living and working in the 21st century. Librarians looking for a sensible, workable approach to help students make sense of their information-rich world will find this book a useful and accessible means of providing the support and understanding they need to thrive. Recommended."—Library Media Connection

"An essential read in the area of collaboration with teachers, teacher-librarians, and other specialists in the school. A gem from the great Kuhlthau and colleagues."—Teacher Librarian

"By virtue of their examination of the process approach to library and information services in K-12 education, the authors are convinced that school librarians are the primary agents for school reform. Utilizing current research and guided by the philosophy of John Dewey, Guided Inquiry is based on a spiral curriculum that teaches children to think and to make informed decisions. The research team at the Center for International Scholarship in School Libraries (CISSL) at Rutgers University assisted in the creation of a systematic model. Guided inquiry is based on the premise that the 21st-century school needs to offer alternative solutions to the Industrial Age model by incorporating the information search process in authentic ways. Promoting deeper learning allows students to answer the deeper questions of their own interests in the world by facing the issues of social perspectives throughout the curriculum....This book is recommended for teachers and school librarians concerned with research-based teaching. Recommended. General readers, graduate students, and professionals."—Choice

"Stop everything you are doing, get a copy of this book, and read it cover to cover in one sitting. Kuhlthau joins forces with a curriculum expert and a museum professional to propose a solid initiative for teachers, teacher-librarians, and administrators. What is that initiative? A constant stream of collaborative, constructivist, and information-centered learning experiences. The authors propose that a teacher-librarian and two complementary subject area teachers join forces to build a learning experience using the best curricular topics with a simple but powerful information literacy model: locate, evaluate, use....Bottom line: For one of the best reads of 2007, our assignment stands: Read this book, talk about it, and begin to understand why it is more important than teaching a few schedule-based information literacy lessons to students as they encounter teachers' assignments."—Teacher Librarian