Topic: Security Studies / International/Transnational Security

 
War and Governance
International Security in a Changing World Order
Richard Weitz
978-0-31334-736-8

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Richard Weitz
Richard Weitz, PhD, is director of the Center for Political-Military Analysis at the Hudson Institute. He is the author or editor of The Russian Military Today and Tomorrow: Essays in Memory of Mary Fitzgerald; Global Security Watch-Russia: A Reference Handbook; a volume of National Security Case Studies; China-Russia Security Relations: Strategic Parallelism without Partnership or Passion?; Kazakhstan and the New International Politics of Eurasia; Mismanaging Mayhem: How Washington Responds to Crisis; The Reserve Policies of Nations: A Comparative Analysis; and Revitalising US-Russian Security Cooperation: Practical Measures.
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War and Governance

International Security in a Changing World Order

Richard Weitz Richard Weitz


October 2011

Praeger

Series: The Changing Face of War

Cover
Pages
Volumes
Size
Hardcover
222
1
6 1/8x9 1/4
 
ISBN
eISBN
978-0-313-34735-1
978-0-313-34736-8
Print in Stock
$48.00

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It is one of the most pressing questions facing humankind: Can war be avoided or limited? To answer that question requires assessing the roles played by various types of actors on the international stage. More than that, it demands that we look beyond realities to recognize the possibilities that might lead to a more peaceful tomorrow.

An insightful and expert assessment examines how best to end—and avert—wars.

How do we avoid war? To arrive at an answer, master analyst Richard Weitz explores the ways nations, international organizations, and individuals have sought to bring order to an inherently disorderly phenomenon—potential and actual violent conflict among organized political entities.

Specifically, War and Governance: International Security in a Changing World Order analyzes a number of critical issues such as whether regional security institutions have distinct advantages and liabilities in promoting international security, as compared with universal organizations like the United Nations. Other important questions are addressed, as well. How will international organizations, such as the UN, EU, and NATO, change the nature of war in the 21st century—and be changed by it? What role might less formal institutions and nongovernmental organizations play in peacemaking? Will the nation-state remain the most important international security actor? The book ends with a gap analysis that identifies incongruities between international needs and capabilities—and suggests ways to overcome them.

Features
• Short case studies
• A survey of key institutions and sub-organizations
• Maps

Highlights
• Shows the essential relationship between politics and war in an up-to-date treatment that takes its assessment through 2010
• Covers both global and regional institutions
• Examines the role of NGOs and alliances in preventing or affecting warfare and its consequences
Richard Weitz, PhD, is director of the Center for Political-Military Analysis at the Hudson Institute. He is the author or editor of The Russian Military Today and Tomorrow: Essays in Memory of Mary Fitzgerald; Global Security Watch-Russia: A Reference Handbook; a volume of National Security Case Studies; China-Russia Security Relations: Strategic Parallelism without Partnership or Passion?; Kazakhstan and the New International Politics of Eurasia; Mismanaging Mayhem: How Washington Responds to Crisis; The Reserve Policies of Nations: A Comparative Analysis; and Revitalising US-Russian Security Cooperation: Practical Measures.