Topic: American History / 1860-1900 - War and Unification

 
Daily Life in the Industrial United States, 1870-1900
Julie Husband, Jim O'Loughlin
978-0-31306-109-7

This eBook may be purchased through the following distributors:

 
Julie Husband, Jim O'Loughlin
ADD COPY 2009 ABC-CLIO

Daily Life in the Industrial United States, 1870-1900

Julie Husband, Jim O'Loughlin Julie Husband, Jim O'Loughlin


September 2004

Greenwood

Series: The Greenwood Press Daily Life Through History Series

Cover
Pages
Volumes
Size
Hardcover
288
1
6 1/8x9 1/4
 
ISBN
eISBN
978-0-313-32302-7
978-0-313-06109-7
Print in Stock
$55.00

add to cart

Explores the effects on industrialization on the daily life of Americans between the years of 1870 to 1900.

Daily life in the Industrial age was ever-changing, unsettling, outright dangerous, and often thrilling. Electric power turned night into day, cities swelled with immigrants from the countryside and from Europe, and great factories belched smoke and beat unnatural rhythms while turning out consumer goods at an astonishing pace. Distance and time condensed as rail travel and telegraph lines tied the vast United States together as never before.

First-hand accounts from workers, housewives, and children help illuminate the significant achievements of the era and their impact on the everyday lives of ordinary people. Readers will learn of a broad range of personal experiences, while comprehending the importance of the economic and social developments of the period. A chronology, a glossary, more than 40 photographs, and further reading sources complete the work.
Acknowledgments
Chronology
Photo Captions
Introduction: "I Felt Everything Get Bigger and Go Quicker Every Day"
The City
The Railroad
The Factory and Organized Labor Responses
Housework, Houses and Women at Home
Childhood and Family Life
Consumer Culture
Leisure and Entertainment
Education and Health Care
Religious and Civic Life
Conclusion: Not the Gilded Age
Glossary
Works Cited
About the Authors
Reviews
First-hand accounts, photographs and newspaper cartoons add to the immediacy of this depiction of life in the industrial age.—Reference & Research Book News