ABC-CLIO

The Meaning of AIDS

Implications for Medical Science, Clinical Practice, and Public Health Policy

by Eric T. Juengst, ed., Barbara A. Koenig, ed.

Print Flyer
Abortion in the United States

February 1989

Praeger

Pages 218
Volumes 1
Size 6 1/8x9 1/4
Topics Health & Wellness/Fitness, Nutrition, and Healthy Living
Description

The editors of this remarkable volume have collected 18 essays by humanists about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome. AIDS seems to seek out as its victims the weakest and already victimized, writes Albert R. Jonsen, describing the inhumanity of this disease. Jonsen states that scientists have already fashioned a language for describing the disease in objective, clinical terms. What is needed now is a language to describe the human experience and instruct us on how to live humanely while AIDS is among us. To help construct this language, this collection examines AIDS from the perspective of the humanities: History can recall past experience for our instruction, Philosophy can define terms such as welfare, freedom, health, and disease, that guide our discourse, and Literature can reveal the images that shape the social reality of AIDS.

Editors Eric T. Juengst and Barbara Koenig begin this study by delineating six interpretations of AIDS. Their aim is to demonstrate the many ways in which AIDS is viewed by society. The book is then divided into three parts. Part One examines how our current knowledge of AIDS was generated and how this knowledge is interpreted. Part Two explores the meaning of AIDS for health professionals and the ethical issues it can raise. Part Three examines public policy and AIDS. The contributors clarify and correct definitions, recall analogous incidents in our history and draw values and principles out of the obscurity of emotions and into the light of reason. divided into three parts. Part One examines the current knowledge of AIDS and how this knowledge is interpreted. Part Two explores the meaning and perceptions of AIDS in the medical community. Part Three examines public policy and AIDS. The contributors clarify and correct definitions, recall analogous incidents in our history and draw values and principles out of the obscurity of emotion and into the light of reason.

Table of Contents

Foreword by Albert R. Jonsen
Introduction: The Many Meanings of AIDS by Eric T. Juengst and Barbara A. Koenig
Interpreting Our Knowledge of AIDS
Naming the AIDS Virus
Causal Explanations of AIDS
Explaining AIDS: A Case Study
Ethics and the Language of AIDS
Making Contact: The AIDS Plays
The AIDS Epidemic: A Phenomenological Analysis off the Infectious Body
The Clinical Experience of AIDS
Duties, Fears and Physicians
Physician Response to a New, Lethal, and Presumably Infectious Disease: Medical Residents and AIDS Epidemic in San Francisco
Life-Sustaining Treatment in Patients with AIDS: Challenges to Traditional Decision Making
Law, Ethics and Advance Directive Regarding the Medical Care of AIDS Patients
AIDS and the Allocation of Intensive Care Unit Beds
AIDS and the Duty to Inform Others
AIDS and the Public Health
Restrictive Public Health Measures and AIDS: An Ethical Analysis
The Concept of Discrimination and the Treatment of People with AIDS
Quarantine in the AIDS Epidemic
Health Care Professionals and the Potential for Iatrogenic Transmission of AIDS: An Ethical Analysis
AIDS: Ethical, Legal and Public Policy Implications
Coercive and Voluntary Policies in the AIDS Epidemic
Bibliography
Index

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